The petzval lens and a nikonfm2n.  #petzval #nikon #fm2n #tuni #percy

The petzval lens and a nikonfm2n. #petzval #nikon #fm2n #tuni #percy

Awesome lunch time surprise at work from @tlrmunko and @mundo1092 and the little bean. #assaultonarkham #batman

Awesome lunch time surprise at work from @tlrmunko and @mundo1092 and the little bean. #assaultonarkham #batman

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Robin Williams, you are missed dearly. #robinwilliams

Robin Williams, you are missed dearly. #robinwilliams

Danni calling out that orange #danni #drawing

Danni calling out that orange #danni #drawing

Jeanne sketch with lots of orange.  Used some #tombow markers #drawing

Jeanne sketch with lots of orange. Used some #tombow markers #drawing

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Eliza Bennett

A Woman’s Work is Never Done

A series of photographic works titled ‘A Woman’s Work is Never Done’ Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ‘ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. 

The technique, I recall first applying to my hand under a table during a home economics class in school. I was totally amazed to find that I could pass a needle under the top layers of skin without any pain, only a mild discomfort.  As with many childhood whims it passed and I hadn’t thought any more about it until quite recently when I decided to apply the process to my hand to make it appear calloused and work worn like that of a manual labourer. Some viewers consider the piece to be a feminist protest, for me it’s about human value. After all, there are many men employed in caring, catering, cleaning etc… all jobs traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. Such work is invisible in the larger society, with ‘A woman’s work’ I aim to represent it.  (artist statement)

Website

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Finished the linework #drawing #danni @creativesuntamed #ink

Finished the linework #drawing #danni @creativesuntamed #ink

It’s been going on for a while so I thought I’d post a bit of it #drawing #danni @creativesuntamed

It’s been going on for a while so I thought I’d post a bit of it #drawing #danni @creativesuntamed

medievalpoc:

prokopetz:

cleopatrasweave:

i drew a bunch of elves of color!!

This post reminds me of something that happened a few years back.

I once served as art director for a project where the illustration spec called for characters of a variety of races (in the real-world sense, not the Dungeons & Dragons sense - though the latter was involved as well).

We had one particular artist, tasked with drawing a series of elves, who didn’t quite seem to get what that meant. Their output was basically “white elf”, “another white elf”, “white elf with a tan”, “white elf looking a bit pale”, “yet another white elf”, etc.

When this was pointed out, they were like “oh, yeah, now I get it - I’ll totally fix that with my next piece”.

They proceeded to turn in a picture of a blue elf.

In the end, we had to provide specific quotas for specific levels of racial representation in order to get the point across. It all worked out in the end, but it’s stuck with me ever since that this artist examined the original spec, looked at our feedback, and came to the conclusion a blue elf was more plausible than a black one.

In conclusion: this is awesome.

Read that last paragraph as many times as you need to.

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